Last edited by Mezijind
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Sexual dysfunction in patients and their partners. found in the catalog.

Sexual dysfunction in patients and their partners.

Francis Gerard McCafferty

Sexual dysfunction in patients and their partners.

by Francis Gerard McCafferty

  • 222 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.D.)--The Queen"s University of Belfast, 1984.

The Physical Object
Pagination1 v
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20868728M

Sexual dysfunction is distressing for female patients and their partners and can have a profoundly negative impact on patient quality of life and self-image. However, providers often find discussion of patient's sexual concerns difficult, due in part to a lack of knowledge, skills, and confidence in their ability to initiate discussion and assess and treat sexual dysfunction. About 4 in 10 women have problems with sex at some point during their lives. If you are having a sexual problem, and it is worrying or upsetting you, you may want to find a solution. Some problems can be solved by you alone, with a partner, or with the help of a gynecologist or other health care professional.

  (including partners, healthcare providers, and patient advocates) about their experiences with female sexual dysfunction and its treatments. Discussion focused on two key topics: .   Cultural factors and sexual dysfunction in clinical practice - Volume 19 Issue 2 - Vishal Bhavsar, Dinesh Bhugra need to be aware of in assessing and treating patients who present with sexual dysfunction. View HTML Send article to Kindle. This pertains to all the authors of the piece, their spouses or partners. Yes No.

  FSD is also related to their partner's function: when erectile failure of male partner has improved, women's desire, sexual arousal, orgasm and satisfaction improves. 64 Female partners of . Sexual dysfunction is “the inability to express one’s sexuality in a manner that is consistent with personal needs and preferences” [3]. In patients who has cancer in the organs involve sexual activity such as breast cancer, colon, rectum, prostrate, and bladder are vulnerable to this issue [4,5]. Sexual dysfunction may be caused by cancer itself or by the treatments.


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Sexual dysfunction in patients and their partners by Francis Gerard McCafferty Download PDF EPUB FB2

There are more than million cancer survivors in the United States in 1 Although there are no definitive statistics, in one survey of cancer survivors, 46% reported sexual health problems related to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, and 71% said that they had received no care for sexual dysfunction.

2 The impact of prostate cancer treatments on erectile dysfunction (ED) is well Author: Celestia S. Higano, Christine Zarowski, Richard Wassersug, Stacy Elliott. Third, this study was based on participant self-reports which creates the possibility of over- or under-reporting.

Fourth, we were not be able to measure all important confounders sexual confidence, emotional well-being, and relationship that might affect the sexual dysfunction of HSCT patients and their : Im-Ryung Kim, Im-Ryung Kim, Seo Yoon Jang, Hyun Suk Shin, Hye Jin Choi, Chul Won Jung, Sung-Soo Yoon.

However, when patients feel too embarrassed to broach the subject of sexual dysfunction with their providers, this significant aspect of human existence is ignored, resulting in a profound and negative impact on cancer survivors’ quality of life, as well as that of their intimate partners.

In book: Suprapontine Lesions and Neurogenic Pelvic Dysfunctions, pp they play a major role in the deterioration of quality of life of patients and their partners. Loss of desire and. As a result, affected men are often reluctant to approach their doctor and, instead, may live for many years with sexual dysfunction, often to the detriment of their personal lives.

Male Sexual Dysfunction: A Clinical Guide covers all the common problems encountered by the clinician in this rapidly expanding and developing field. The inclusion criteria were as follows: 1) patients who were 18 or older, 2) 2) patients experiencing their first session of hemodialysis, 3) a dialysis schedule of three times per week for at least six months, 4) having a sexual partner, and 5) being male.

Patient sexuality issues can be difficult and daunting for a doctor to explore, but accurate diagnosis and effective treatment hinge on good communication between doctor and patient, as well as between the patient and her sexual partner.

Given the increasing emphasis on sexuality in our society, the continuing sexual activity of midlife and older women and their partners, the aging of. The term sexual dysfunction became part of the vocabulary of clinical medicine in with the publication of Masters and Johnson’s Human Sexual Inadequacy.

1 Before this book appeared, male sexual problems were conceived of as either premature ejaculation or impotence, and most female sexual function problems were categorized under. In fact, patients with mental disorders often suffer from sexual dysfunctions and in many cases, pharmacological treatment causes sexual-dysfunction side-effects.

However, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders and psychotic disorders are often also characterized by sexual symptoms that have a profound impact on sexual function. Patients and their partners should discuss concerns with their doctor or other qualified health professional.

Honest communication of feelings, concerns, and preferences is important. In general, a wide variety of treatment modalities are available for patients with sexual dysfunction. Sexual health and the psychological well-being of patients with renal failure is an important issue that should be considered in nursing practice.

Nurses should take the psychological problems of patients and their relations with partners into account and consider these problems in a holistic manner. Research suggests that erectile dysfunction has a negative impact on men and their partners, and it might be a considerable source of distress for both members of a couple.

Involving your partner in your erectile dysfunction treatment might help improve your treatment success and restore a positive sexual experience for you both. For patients with chronic illness and their partners, a satisfying sex life is one way of feeling normal when so much else about their lives has changed.

The Medical Journal of Australia. Erectile Dysfunction and Scleroderma. Men With Erectile Dysfunction Are Twice As Likely to Have Heart Disease, Study Says. A total of 22 patients with combined cervical spondylotic myelopathy and sexual dysfunction on admission were treated with surgery for their neck problems.

Most of these patients had an abnormal psychogenic erection (18/22, 82%) before surgery. Sexual dysfunction is difficulty experienced by an individual or a couple during any stage of a normal sexual activity, including physical pleasure, desire, preference, arousal or ing to the DSM-5, sexual dysfunction requires a person to feel extreme distress and interpersonal strain for a minimum of six months (excluding substance or medication-induced sexual dysfunction).

In book: Sexual Dysfunctions in Mentally Ill Patients, pp To provide an update on clinical and experimental evidence regarding sexual dysfunction in patients with MS from both sexes. Alternative sources of information include the patient's sexual partner if the patient is agreeable and the Brief Sexual Symptom Checklist self-report tool that patients can fill out.

1 Information regarding the patient's sexual history also provides appropriate context for the sexual dysfunction. It should include the age of the first sexual. “The patients who are the most successful are those where the sexual partner is a true partner,” says Shoskes.

“If the woman can come in, that’s a huge help.” 5. Have patience with pills. With respect to treatment, surgery did not improve sexual function and there is no scientific evidence regarding medical treatments.

Patients stated that they would like to treat their sexual problems with healthcare professionals. In conclusion, sexual and erectile dysfunction are common in HS patients, and negatively affect their quality of life. Role of theTherapist • Sexuality counselors and sex therapists typically treat patients with desire, arousal, performance, and satisfaction also counsel patients and their partners who have experienced sexual trauma or abuse, or those who may be struggling with gender identity or sexual orientation issues, fetishes, sexual pain.

Any sexual behavior-normal or abnormal, masturbatory or partnered-ultimately rests on biological elements, psychological elements, interpersonal elements, and cultural concepts of normality and morality. 1 The psychiatrist who develops an interest in patients' sexual concerns will have many opportunities to build a deep understanding of these 4 elements as the physician-patient relationship.

Among women included in 15 studies, mean scores on the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) in all patient groups were below the threshold for sexual dysfunction .This support has dramatically improved the quality of life of patients and their significant others.

All men and their partners should read this book prior to undergoing prostate cancer treatment. This second edition highlights the patient and partner experience of acknowledging that sexual health is a fundamental part of treating the whole.